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General Discussion / electrical question
« Last post by johnboy on August 27, 2015, 06:54:30 PM »
hi new to forum
recently purchase a house built in the sixties .
we have a small shed / man cave thing more like cave that looked to have power to it but nothing worked so i purchased a deta electrical tester pen that tests power threw cable and found it had no power .long story short worked on every thing else and when placed near copper water pipe it sounded for power also . Pipe has earth strap to it .does this mean there is power to pipe i.e. will i get a zap when in shower and something is turned on ::sad::  :shock:  :shock:  :shock:

thanks john and bel
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General Discussion / Re: Welcome to our Home Renovators Forum!
« Last post by johnboy on August 27, 2015, 06:53:41 PM »
thanks for starting it up hope more people will join in
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Tips, Techniques and How To's / Turning off the Water!
« Last post by admin on June 28, 2012, 06:59:39 PM »
All I'm going to say is don't forget to turn off the isolation switch on your Solar Hot water system on the roof as well as the water meter if you need to do works involving any hot water taps or flickmasters.

There's a whole lot of water sitting in reserve up on your roof that just rushes back out if you've forgotten that one.

Yes - I didn't think about this one when replacing a flickmaster in the ensuite basin. Very wet cabinetry - had to race outside and turn off really quickly.  Nothing that lots of towels couldn't fix.

:)
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Suppliers, Trades, Supplies / Bunnings or Masters
« Last post by admin on June 28, 2012, 06:54:27 PM »
Well now there are three places I now find myself loitering around in - Bunnings, BCF and now MASTERS!

Masters is totally a different experience to any I've seen before.  The aisles are wide and well categorised merchandise and the isles done just run in one direction they blocks which cause you to amble around into different areas.  Kind of more 'slow' shopping style where you can't just get to your isle and get the item and off you go.

The floors are polished cement - creating a cleaner environment - kind of appealing to the Virgo woman in me as I may like putting on the tool belt and fixing /building things but I don't need to work in squaller.

Overall I found several items dearer than Bunnings i.e. shade cloth to name one common purchase.

Masters seemed to have a 'seasonal' area and at the moment it is all things heating and the selection was fabulous and thought provoking for wishlist renovators like me.

I then ambled over to the kitchen display area.  Masters have whitegoods! Or should I say silver/stainless as finding the humble white fridge is near gone.  Anyhow a great selection of appliances - rows of fridges - good point of difference and direct competition to Harvey Norman and Good Guys.

Masters also have many more storage concept option i.e. fridges built into cabinetry that you can install yourself - millionaire look.  Pull out tall cupboards that are way more functional than the Bunnings Zone range.

Overall - Bunnings and Masters have several points of difference - personally I think I find myself going to Masters for ideas and Bunnings to buy because there is definitely a price difference.
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Planning & Design - Town Planning, Architects, etc. / Patio Awning - Brisbane
« Last post by admin on June 28, 2012, 06:40:09 PM »
I've been wanting to install a patio awning for quite some time now and wanted to know if anyone knows info on requirements in Brisbane. The Tamawood plans have reference to a patio fixings but no patio drawn - would I therefore technically be right to just install?  And do you even need planning approval if the patio is not enclosed?  Any help kindly appreciated.
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Painting, Paper or Stenciling? / Suede Effects Paint
« Last post by admin on June 28, 2012, 06:37:12 PM »
With winter months around I really do still enjoy the feature wall I painted in my dining room soooo many years ago.  I painted it a warm reddish / terracotta using suede effects paint. 

The house has been rented out a couple of times and the paint is now 11 years old and still looking great and aging well.

You can't really wash this type of paint as it is a dry texture.  It was really monotonous to paint on I remember as you had to do tiny criss cross in really tight pattern that although the perfection of its application appealed to this Virgo - her wrists really suffered - not to mention how much wine I spilt when painting and forgot I was holding my wine in the other hand - giggle.  Well what is a girl to do when it took a good few hours in the evening right on drinks hour :)

Anyhow - it really does well to add warmth and feature to a nice dining room and especially comes into its own during winter. 

All in all I'm still pretty chuffed as to how well it's lasted.  I don't think it will be easy to paint over - probably sanding and washing / priming will be needed given it will be hard for another paint to grab on.
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DIY - Do It Yourself Stories / Leaking Toilet - a woman's approach
« Last post by admin on June 28, 2012, 06:23:04 PM »
My ensuite toilet had been leaking from the cistern into the bowl for quite some time.  I had started hearing what I thought was the cistern filling noise - really low but couldn’t understand as surely the cistern must be full - I mean where was there for water to go?  I looked at the water in the pan and yes there was a trickle flowing but only so slight as to barely make movement on the water.

This then being appropriately ignored by me for several months turned into quite a flow until I received my ever escalating water bill.

Time now to fix the leaking cistern.  As near as I could figure it would be a seat gasket at the bottom of that centre plunger thingy that would be letting water through. Being a plastic fantastic Tamawood spec install toilet from 2001 the buttons were now discolouring from sunlight and the plastic was releasing that tired plastic smell - you know like kettles do after a while.

So I thought well maybe I should just replace the whole wall mounted cistern.  I mean how hard could it be :)

Off to Bunnings - my other home away from home.  I found the nicest man in the plumbing area.  Told him my issues and he concurred that it would indeed probably be more efficient to replace the cistern. Now cisterns come with new seats and skirt piece so that was a bonus as the seat was tired too.

I think it cost $79 for the box - cistern, seat, skirt, all seals, etc. a good deal when you consider the price of seal kit or seat alone.

OK so have all pieces to hand and time to pull out the old one and install the new one.  I pulled the box apart to see what I've to work with.

1.  Put towels down on the floor near the chrome wall fixings and turn off the water tight. There is no need to turn off the water to the house when replacing a cistern thanks to this isolation tap.

2.   Remove the cistern lid - sit it aside - flush the toilet and hold up the plunger so as all water runs out into the bowl.

3.   Unscrew the chrome pipe from the bottom of the cistern.  There is no need to unscrew anything back closer to the wall - just separate from the cistern.  Unscrew the large plastic ring at the bottom of the cistern that connects to the bend and into the back of the porcelain part of the toilet - I think this is called the key. You can now unscrew the two screws at the top of the plastic cistern and then you'll be able to pull it away from the wall in one piece.

4.  Remove the whole pipe that runs into the back of the porcelain base - including key seal. Sit it aside in the the old cistern. Remove seat and skirt with the two plastic screws and give toilet a clean like it's new again.

5.  Take the skirt outside and use it as a template to cut the new skirt down to size.  A hacksaw has the nicest cut for this.

6.   Wet the new key seal and slide onto the bottom of the new pipe as in the box. You'll know which end as one end will already have the round plastic ring ready to affix to the bottom of the cistern so common sense dictates the key seal goes on the other end. Ensure the key seal is on the right way round.  Check visually to the old one that you've uninstalled to mimic. Slide the key into the back of the porcelain base.  It will feel a little flimsy but wait.

7.  Now mount the new cistern on the wall in a way that it lines up with base key seal pipe + intake pipe and visually looks centred on the wall as your new cistern may not be the same size as your old one.  Line up as well so to hide paint lines etc. Oh and give the wall a wipe where the cistern was before mounting as there is usually a dirt line from dust from old one.

8.  Excitement!  Screw on the key seal pipe plastic ring until firm whilst ensuring that the key seal is seated properly.  Will still feel flimsy - as the seal is wet when it dries out it tightens. The action of sealing is by the depth of the pipe into the back of the toilet and held in place by the base of the cistern + nice big juicy seal so don't worry.  Now tighten on the in take pipe.  Turn on isolator tap. Hopefully the cistern will fill and there will be no leaks.

9.  Now finish off by placing lid on cistern.  Arrange skirt into the back of the seat and screw seat down.  Hint - arrange them together with the screws seated then slide forward into porcelain holes and tighten with base nuts.

Voila!  You have successfully replaced your own cistern.

Now off to the laundry for the dirty towels and old cistern /seat etc to the bin.
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General Discussion / Welcome to our Home Renovators Forum!
« Last post by admin on June 16, 2012, 04:10:06 PM »
Welcome to our Home Renovators Forum!

We hope you enjoy using your forum. 

Thanks!
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